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4 Simple steps to get audience hooked: The Hook Model

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Enter the name of practically any successful consumer online company into your search bar and follow it with the word “addict.” I’ll wait for you. Try searching for “Facebook addict,” “Twitter addict,” or “Pinterest addict” and you’ll quickly receive a barrage of results from addicted users and onlookers slamming the narcotic-like features of these web services.

Hook model

How do these corporations, which produce little more than bits of code displayed on a computer, appear to be able to manipulate consumers’ minds? Why are these sites so appealing, and what does their influence indicate for the web’s future? 

What is Hook model

The Hook Model is a four-step approach that organisations can use to build products or services that customers use on a regular basis. The goal is to achieve high-frequency, voluntary interaction. The Hook Model is all about forming a customer habit. It also aims to connect a customer’s problem to a company’s answer on a regular enough basis to make the interaction a habit.

If you are looking to create a hook model for your business then it will be of great benefit to have a ready to go template. Check out the hooked model template.

You can also download various other business model slides for your business, which can drastically impact your business meetings and presentations.

Nir Eyal and the history of Hook model

Nir Eyal, an entrepreneur, author, and behavioural economist, created the Hook Model technique. His product development strategy is focused on the establishment of habitual behaviours through a looping cycle that includes a trigger, an action, a changeable reward, and continual investment.

Importance of the Hook model

A corporation that develops strong user habits improves its bottom line in a variety of ways. For starters, this type of company instils associations with “internal triggers” in the minds of people. That is, users arrive at the site without being prompted. Rather than relying on costly marketing or worrying about distinctiveness, habit-forming enterprises enable users to cue themselves to action by connecting their services to the customers’ everyday routines and emotions.

A ingrained behaviour occurs when users subconsciously think, “I’m bored,” and immediately think of Facebook. “I wonder what’s going on in the world?” they thought. Twitter is the solution before rationale thought begins. The most obvious solution prevails.

It is critical to understand what motivates customer behaviour in order to create goods that customers would use on a regular basis. With this insight, businesses can gain a major competitive advantage. The Hook Model should be used by product teams and product managers early in the product development process because it assures that new goods or services become habit-forming.

How the model works

An automatic activity induced by situational signals is classified as a habit. Businesses can fundamentally modify customer behaviour by building repeating actions, or habits, for products or services using the Hook Model.

Companies can achieve this by guiding clients through a sequence of encounters known as “hooks.” The more clients who encounter these hooks, the more probable they will become habit-forming.

The 4 Phases of the Hook

Trigger (External or Internal):

This is the behaviour’s actuator. It triggers the action, which leads to the formation of a habit. A corporation that develops strong user habits improves its bottom line in a variety of ways. For starters, this type of company instils associations with “internal triggers” in the minds of people. That is, users arrive at the site without being prompted.

Rather than relying on costly marketing or worrying about distinctiveness, habit-forming enterprises enable users to cue themselves to action by connecting their services to the customers’ everyday routines and emotions. An ingrained behaviour occurs when users subconsciously think, “I’m bored,” and immediately think of Facebook. “I wonder what’s going on in the world?” they thought. Twitter is the solution before rationale thought begins. The most obvious solution prevails.

Action:

Behaviour carried out in anticipation of a reward. The planned action follows the trigger. Companies use two pulleys of human behaviour in this case: motivation and ability. To maximise the likelihood of a user performing the targeted action, the behaviour designer makes the action as simple as possible while also increasing the user’s motivation.

This Hook phase employs the theory and practice of usability design to guarantee that the user behaves as the designer intended.

Variable Reward: The problem that is solved as a result of the action made promotes the behaviour cycle. Rewards of the Tribe (social rewards based on connection and acceptance), Rewards of the Hunt (quest for material resources), and Rewards of the Self are examples of reward kinds (personal gratification in the form of mastery or self-realization).

Hooks differ from a standard feedback loop in their ability to elicit desire in the user. Feedback loops abound, but predictable ones do not elicit desire. The anticipated response of your refrigerator light turning on when you open the door does not compel you to keep opening it. However, add some variation to the mix—say, a different delicacy arrives in your fridge every

Investment: A future-oriented action that develops a product or service. The user is prompted to complete some work in the Hook’s last step. As far as the behaviour engineer is concerned, this phase has two objectives. The first is to improve the likelihood that the user will pass through the Hook again when provided with the next trigger.

Secondly, now that the user’s brain is flooded with dopamine from the previous phase’s anticipation of reward, it’s time to pay some expenses. The user is generally asked to give some mixture of time, info, effort, social capital, or money as an investment.

You can only correctly link the right variable reward with the anticipated consumer behaviour if you understand what genuinely matters to people. Rewards must be consistent with the user’s internal triggers and motivations and fit into the narrative of ‘why’ the product is utilised.

Author Bio:

Alex Roy is a content writer who works for slidebazaar, who is passionate about marketing and business. He also loves to write poetry and short essays. You can find him hitchhiking through the countryside when he is not working.

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