Friday, December 3Welcome

4 Fundraising Event Mistakes You Should Avoid at all Costs

Fundraising events are very important for nonprofits and organizations that rely heavily on donations. They can be a great way for organizations to get funds if they’re in a cash crunch or want to work on big projects. They can also use them as a tool to bring awareness to a cause or their brand and show their donors some appreciation. Unfortunately, too many organizations make mistakes that end up ruining their efforts and show them in a bad light. Let’s take a look at a few fundraising mistakes you should avoid at all costs.

Starting without Clear Objectives

Before you start a fundraising event, you need to have a clear plan and set of objectives. You should start by setting a budget, finding the perfect location for the event, and setting up different goals. Your goals shouldn’t be financial only. Yes, having a target for donations is important, but so is building awareness and increasing engagement. So, you will not only have to set objectives but you’ll need a system to measure results as well.

If you want to know how to plan a fundraising event perfectly, you should check out this fundraising toolkit by Fundraising Brick. Their fundraising toolkit has a helpful checklist that shows you exactly what should be done before the event and when. This will allow you to have all bases covered and avoid last-minute surprises.

Making it a One-Size-Fits-All Event

Before you build an event that will be accessible to all your donors, you should consider having separate events for the public and your regular donors. Major donors should get something a bit more upscale to make them feel special. This could also be a great time to speak to them on a more personal level and touch on the organization’s plans for the future. Being surrounded by other top donors will also push them to be a bit more generous, and you should honor those who give the biggest donations to encourage giving.

Not Having a Clear Leader

A lot of nonprofits have a loose sense of hierarchy, and it might work better in some cases, but not when planning a fundraising event. You need to have a clear head with a few aids that will report what’s going on the ground and make some executive decisions from time to time.

Not Hiring a Professional Auctioneer

The live auction will be where fundraising events will make most of their profits, so you have to get it right. You can’t have just anyone be in that auction chair. Professional auctioneers have a very unique set of skills that allows them to get the most out of donors. Not everyone can hold a conversation with 200 to 300 people at a time and make things interesting while keeping track of bids. Hiring an auctioneer is a minor expense when considering the returns you’ll get on your investment, so don’t be stingy.

If you want to reach your objectivesand build an event people will remember, avoid these mistakes. Plan early and invest where it counts if you want the best results.